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20121201
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the department of justice or the federal district court in washington, d.c. so, the state of florida, for an example, never sought to get clearance to purge. and they're hiding behind there may be fraud. that's their own. amy goodman: you were on that selma to montgomery march. this. can you explain what happened, as we go back, what, almost half a century now? rep. john lewis: on march 7, 1965, a group of us attempted to march from selma to montgomery, alabama, to dramatize to the nation that people wanted to register to vote. one young african-american man had been shot and killed a few days earlier, in an adjoining county called perry county-this is in the black belt of alabama-the home county of mrs. martin luther king jr., the home county of mrs. ralph abernathy, the home county of mrs. andrew young. and because of what happened to him, we made a decision to march. in selma, alabama, in 1965, only 2.1 percent of blacks of voting age were registered to vote. the only place you could attempt to register was to go down to the courthouse. you had to pass a so-called literacy test. a
on washington. he has been arrested more than 40 times and has just written a new book called across that vision for change. he visited us in our studio, and i asked congressmember lewis about the voter purge in florida, where the justice department had sued to block republican governor rick scott's controversial effort to remove thousands of registered voters from the rolls, using an outdated drivers' license database to ostensibly identify non-citizens registered to vote. rep. john lewis: it is unreal, it is unbelievable, that at this time in our history, 47 years after the voting rights act was passed and signed into law, that we're trying to go backward. i think there is a systematic, deliberate attempt on the part of so many of these states-not just florida, but it's all across the country, it's not just southern states-to keep people from participating. i think there is an attempt to steal this election before it even takes place, to make it hard, to make it difficult for our seniors, for our students, for minorities, for the disabled to participate in the democratic process. it's not righ
: chris joining us from philadelphia, democrats' line with representative rick larsen from washington state. caller: thank you, c-span, for what you provide the american people. i find this whole situation ironic. the fiscal cliff scares me personally -- and i think president obama certainly has shown his willingness to compromise whereas the republicans and tea party do not seem to want to do so. this ideology they are sticking to will ruin our economy and i find it hypocritical because their chief criticism of the president during the presidential campaign was his mismanagement of our economy and they are willing to mismanage our economy down the drain on some principal. it does not seem they care about the american people. they care about the part of the american people, the rich, that is what seems like to me and i am sick of it. i used to be republican and i switched party about, i guess eight or 10 years ago. which has something to do with philadelphia politics as well because you cannot have much say in philadelphia politics unless you are democrat but that is beside the point.
. host: that is a shot of the union station in weiss did, d.c. -- in washington, d.c.. we will take a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll
time. that does it for today's "washington journal." will be back tomorrow. the live coverage of the house of representatives live on c- span. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 18, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable nan s. hayworth to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the house will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. i have been directed by the house -- sflat that the house that the senate has passed a bill in which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other t
to washington as often, and i would say, even more often than the alaska members in the house and senate. he made -- they made a point to stop by his office on a regular occasion to talk to him about what has happened in the past, what's going on today, and what they look for in the future. earlier this year, senator inouye was in alaska at my invitation, his last trip to alaska. he told them a memorable story about his support of the trans alaska oil pipeline, which was controversial when he supported it in its construction. now, senator inouye has a unique style of how to tell stories, and you got to just pay attention and listen. they're no very to the point. senator inouye told this story told by opponents of the pipe lynn that it would -- of the pipeline that it would destroy the caribou. this was what he would told over and over again. again in his last trip, he was in front of a group of people, and i was anxious as he started to tawfnlg he said, i have this story tell you. he talked about this time of controversy about the alaska north slope and the oil pipeline and the caribou and w
vacation short and heading back to washington before we fall off of the fiscal cliff . can a deal be reached. >> a deadly winter storm unleashing snow and tornados . now thousands ever cleaning up and holiday travelers are stuck. i am tracking where the storm ised hading next. >> thank you, rick. take the gift card and hit the stores this morning. wait until "fox and friends" is over and then leave. "fox and friends" begins right now. "fox and friends". >> gretchen: good morning, i am gretchen carlson we are joined by clayton morris . rick as well . these are great guys, but clayton, because he is a tech guru of folks news and here to help all of us today. >> tech support this morning f. you have tech-related questions. send them and i will attempt to answer them all. i answered all of them. my wife said what are you doing on twitter? i said i am helping me. >> gretchen: we have big storms brewing and rick, you are aptly sitting to the right of me and you will help people get out of town. >> 30 tornados and a big one in mobile, alabama and more tornados and a blizzard. i will try
to write the book. i had a law practice here in washington for many, many years. i did keep notes, and i felt ultimately, um, that i would put it together, and i'd piece it together for a magazine article. and then it expanded, and it became what it is right now. but always behind in my mind i want young people to know, i want young people to know that this ugliness happened. and so it took a while. my brother is a writer up in new york, and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife back into my first year legal research because i had to certify, authorize this was a piece of nonfiction, and you have to put down. i felt with a memoir you could just wig it. well, you can't because once you start highlighting things, you have to get authority for it. you even have to get a concept from people who you put photographs in, the consent of the army, consent of all -- i had a letter from james meredith right after i left which is in the book it, and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, well, you need his permission. i didn't need his
clinton and left washington. she resumed her princeton professorship and life in new jersey with her husband and two teenage sons. in the wake of her departure, slaughter wrote a cover story for "the atlantic" magazine, why women still can't have it all. within days the piece became the most read in "the atlantic's" 150-year history. over 1 million views in the first week alone. tonight ann marie slaughter takes us behind that personal decision that became a raging public debate. explain the intensity of that kind of job because it's really much more than what many people think. this is a more intense job than a very senior job in the private sector. >> it's certainly comparable. it's an assistant secretary level job which means, you know, you're on pretty much all the time. you're the head of the secretary of state's private think tank and that means you cover the entire world just as she does and you're on for everything she needs you to do and sort of the longer term planning, and you work pretty much around the clock. >> so you're working probably six days a week. >> absolutely.
colleague from washington, mr. reichert, who knows firsthand the power of d.n.a. evidence from his years as a sheriff. and finally and most importantly, katie's family and her mother. she has endured every parent's worst nightmare. her determination and dedication are inspiring and when katie's law is signed into law, and it will be, it will be a testament to her work and her love for her daughter. mr. speaker, i urge the house to pass katie's law and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i yield four minutes to the gentleman from new mexico, mr. pearce. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new mexico is recognized for four minutes. mr. pearce: i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding and i thank the gentleman from california, mr. schiff, for his leadership on this. i rise in strong support of h.r. 6014 today. katie sepich, her picture her here, tells us a lot. she was fun-loving, vibrant, outgoing. she was a leader in our age group. she made things happen. kati
now. why do i bring this up? is there anybody in washington, d.c. who is talking about cutting tax rates? and the answer is no. there's really not. there's not one person in this chamber who comes to the floor and talks about cutting tax rates. we might like to but we're in a tough economic crisis right now and folks are concerned about the revenue side of the equation. what folks are talking about, though, is not raising tax rates. for some reason, for reasons that i can't understand, mr. speaker, the president has gotten wrapped around the axle on an insistence that actual rates go up. speaker john boehner offered him revenue he said if you just want the money, we'll find a way to get money through taxes, it doesn't have to be through higher rates, we can do it through eliminating loopholes and exemses, broadening the base. the president said i want higher rates. when we're not talking about higher rate fless white house, mr. speaker, we're talking about fairness. i've got to tell you, mr. speaker, dadgummit, you and i are freshmen in this body, we came with the largest freshmen
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
the department of defense, they'll have 1600 of the collectors according to the washington post, there are already around 500 case officers at the defense intelligence agency. gathers tension for the military by 2018. they'll have about a thousand and that number will keep growing as the defense intelligence agency transitions over to the new dcs spies will be trained by the cia, but unlike the cia, the dcs is not going to be able to do anything, but gath gather intelligence, political sabotage and drone strikes continue to be cia operations and of dcs, focus on i.d.ing targets. and in recent months, those priorities have been keeping tabs on problem areas like africa, iran, north korea and even the strengthening military in china. this was signed off on by the defense secretary, leon panetta who used to be a cia chief and by general david petraeus who stepped down as cia chief after an extramarital affair was exposed last month, as for funding, the pentagon gave the dcs about 100 million dollars just to get the program started, but their overall budget is not expected to grow.
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
period. host: you can continue the conversation online and tomorrow on washington journal. we'll be talking about this 7:00 a.m. eastern. you can send us your tweets and check out what others have to say at cspan.org/fiscal cliff. the news of the evening the house is out until past christmas and that's because they pulled the plan b fiscal cliff bill and speaker boehner saying he did not have the support to pass that bill. up next we will bring you some of the floor debate on the bill that did pass, the bill that did pass and replaces the spending cuts from other agencies. >> and by every small business owner looking to expand and hire. we have passed bills and put forward reforms that would save programs like social security, medicare and medicaid from certain and predictable failure. yet we cannot find cooperation mr. speaker from the white house or the other side of the aisle to help solve these problems. it is unfornl that we find ourselves in this place just 11 days from the new year. for months we have been ready and willing to work with the president to prevent the fisc
's ecowas write the book. i have a lot practiced in washington for many years. i felt ultimately that i would put it together and piece it together. a magazine article and it expanded and it became what it is right now. always in my mind, i want young people to know. i want young people to know the this happened and so it took a while. my brother is a writer in new york and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife, back into my first year of legal research because i had to certify, authorize this piece of nonfiction. i felt with a memoir you could just wing it you can't because once you start highlighting things you've got to get authority for it. you even have to get consent from the people that you put photographs and. i had a letter from james meredith right after i left, which is in the book itself and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, we need his permission. i don't need his permission. he sent it to me that he didn't send us the world. i send a form letter to jackson mississippi and he signed it on the backside of
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16